Amylase# the second ?-1#4 glycosidic bond# instantaneously separating#

Amylase# an amylase is the enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of
starch# into
sugars. Amylase is the present in human #saliva and the in some other mammals# where# the chemical process# of digestion begins.
Foods that contain huge amounts#
of starch but little#
sugar# such as rice
and the potatoes#
can #obtain a
slightly# sweet
taste because they are the chewed because the #amylase degrades# some of the starch in the sugar. The
pancreas# and the
salivary gland the #produce
amylase (alpha amylase) to the hydrolyze #food starch into dis theaccharides and the tris the
accharides that other enzymes change into glucose to the offer energy to the
the body. Plants and the some bacteria also produce amylase. As a diastase# amylase was the# first enzyme dis
thecovered# and the
theolated (by Anselme Payen in 1833). The #specific proteins of amylase are the #designated with
dissimilar Greek letters.#
All amylases are the glucoside hydrolases# and the act on ?-1#4-glycosidic bonds.

Classification:

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?-amylases:

Amylases (EC 3.2.1.1) (CAS No. 9014-71-5)
(alternative names: 1#4-?-D-glucan
glucanhydrolase#
glucogenase) are the calcium calcium enzymes. Acting in rand theom positions# along the starch chain# ?-amylase# decomposes long-chain
carbohydrates#
eventually producing maltotriose and the amylose maltose or maltose# glucose and# the “dextrin
limit” of amylopectin. Because it can act# anywhere on the# substrate# ?-amylase tends to the be faster# than ?-amylase. In
animals# it is the
vital digestive#
enzyme and the optimal#
pH is the 6.7-7.0.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

? -amylase:

Another form of alternative# names of amylase# ?-amylase: 1s# 4-a-D-glucan
maltohydrolase; glucogenasa; saccharidamylase) is the also produced by# bacteria# fungi and the plants.
Operating from the non-reducing #end# ?-amylase catalyzes the
hydrolysis the# of
the second ?-1#4
glycosidic bond#
instantaneously separating#
two glucose# units
(maltose). During the ripening of the# fruit#
beta-amylase breaks#
down the starch into#
maltose# resulting
in a sweet taste of the ripe fruit#.

Both ?-amylase and the ?-amylase are the
present in the seeds; ?-amylase is the #present in an inactive form#before germination##while ?-amylase and the proteases look
once germination#
has begun. Many microbes also produce amylases to the degrade extracellular
starches. Animal tis thesues do not contain beta-amylase##while it may be present# in microorganis thems
contained in the#
digestive tract. The optimal#
pH for ?-amylase is the 4.0-5.