During Sassoon uses the phrase, “dark clouds smoulder

During the late 1800’s to the early 1900’s, the world underwent a revolution that drastically changed the course of many lives. World War I was characterized by the inescapability of this conflict; and the imminent danger that many soldiers were forced to face. Furthermore, during the Enlightenment and Revolution period, the use of realism and expression arose within poetry. Through this, authors like Siegfried Sassoon, expressed the realistic oppression of the world, through the use of poetry. Sassoon uses events that soldiers have experienced to express the horrors of World War I, a type of poetry that many people, at the time, could relate to. Through Siegfried Sassoon’s poem, “How to Die”, the appalling truth of killing on the battlefield, of killing another human being, and of killing moral standards are revealed to the world.    In the poem, “How To Die”, Sassoon discusses the true nature of war through the use of vivid imagery, dramatic setting, and symbols, creating a sorrowful mood. Sassoon uses the phrase, “dark clouds smoulder into red”(1) making it clear, to the readers, the inevitable death of the soldier, as he recognizes that this will be the last sunset of his life. Sassoon continues with the phrase, “sullen faces white as chalk”(11). Comparing the faces of the soldiers to chalk symbolizes how war has left them as pale, lifeless husks of their former selves. The author  continues the poem at a more personal level by stating, “You’d think, to hear some people talk”(9). His use of the word “you” used directly at the audience creates a more meaningful message, bringing a whole new, realistic perspective to the war. Ultimately, Sassoon uses realism writing in order to illustrate a clear picture of the war. Through his use of imagery and symbolism, he successfully creates a solemn mood. Sasson suspects that society believes dying soldiers lose their discipline and break down childishly, and that a soldier is driven only by selfish desire in his final moments. Contrary to popular belief, Sasson exposes the soldiers and how they defy this stereotype by not passing away yelling ad groaning in pain, but rather dying with pride and self esteem.